FANDOM


The Eurovision Song Contest has seen many ways of voting throughout its near 60 years. To date, there have been 8 voting procedures, some dropped, some repeated.

Year Points System
1956 2 points Two jury members from each country award two points to their favorite song.
1957-1961 1-10 points Ten jury members per country have ten points to give to their favorite songs.
1962 3, 2 and 1 points Ten jury members per country could give points to their three favorite songs.
1963 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1 points Ten jury members per country could give points to their five favorite songs.
1964-1966 5, 3, and 1 points Ten jury members per country could give points to their three favorite songs.
1967-1969 1-10 points Ten jury members per country have ten points to give to their favorite songs.
1970 1-10 points All countries had ten jury members that had ten points to award to their favorite songs. A tie-break round was introduced in the event of a tie.
1971-1973 2-10 points Two jury members (one aged between 16 and 25 and the other aged 25 to 55 years old) had to rate every song between one and five points.
1974 1-10 points All countries had ten jury members that had ten points to award to their favorite songs.
1975-1996 12, 10, 8, 7-1 points All countries had at least one jury member that would award points to their top ten songs. Count-back method introduced in the event of a tie (see Tie Situation).
1997-2003 12, 10, 8, 7-1 points Some countries had jury members and some countries used televote to decide which songs would get points.
2004-2008 12, 10, 8, 7-1 points All countries used televoting to decide which songs would receive points.
2009-2015 12, 10, 8, 7-1 points All countries votes decided by a 50/50 combination of jury and televoting. Televoters have 20 votes to use.
2016 12, 10, 8, 7-1 points 50/50 jury/televote combination continued with all delegations. However, the spokespersons will reveal the jury votes first, and the televotes will be announced at the end by the hosts.

The 12-point system that is still used today was introduced in 1975, Luxembourg was the very first recipient of the "douze points", receiving it from the Netherlands.  From 1975 to 1979, the points were read at random according to the performance order of the receiving country.  From 1980 onward, the points were read in ascending numerical order to increase the excitement factor for the audience as to which country would get the 12 points.  Starting in 2006, the spokesperson would only announce the top 3 scores of each country after 1- through 7-point scores were shown on the screen in order to slash a big percentage off the overall running time.

The 2004 contest was the first time there would be a semi final at the Eurovision Song Contest, but this saw a slight change in the way of voting compared to previous years.

For the first time, countries that did not qualify from the Semi Final would still be allowed to cast votes in the Grand Final. This resulted in Ukraine's Ruslana coming first with a record 280 points. If the voting had been the same as the voting conducted between 1956 and 2003, where only finalist countries could vote, then Serbia and Montenegro's Željko Joksimović would have won the 2004 contest with 190 points - with a 15-point lead over second place Ruslana, who would have scored 175 points. To date, non-qualifying countries are still allowed to vote in the Grand Final. 

With the introduction of two semi-finals in 2008, a new method of selecting finalists was created. The top nine songs ranked by televote qualified, along with one song selected by the back-up juries. This method in most cases meant that the tenth song in the televote placing failed to qualify, and attracted some criticism, especially from Macedonia, who in both years placed 10th in the televote. In 2010, the system used in the 2009 final, where the winner is selected by a combination of televoting and jury votes, was also used to select the semi-finalists.

2016

In 2016, there will be a new voting format. The professional juries and televoters from each country will each award a separate set of points from 1 to 8, 10 and 12. The procedure will go ahead as normal, with the spokespersons announcing the jury votes. The televotes will be counted and combined and announced by the hosts at the end of the show with the country with the fewest televotes being announced first, leading up to the eventual winner.

This will create more excitement for the viewers.

Video

What happens with your vote in the Eurovision Song Contest01:37

What happens with your vote in the Eurovision Song Contest

Explanation of the new Eurovision Song Contest voting format01:15

Explanation of the new Eurovision Song Contest voting format

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.